Feature: Beecher Terrace

The Beecher Terrace Archaeological Project is the largest urban archaeology effort to date in Louisville. The project is focused on the Beecher Terrace Housing Complex, which occupies 12 city blocks on 39 acres between 9th and 13th Streets and Jefferson and Muhammad Ali Boulevard in downtown Louisville. The Beecher Terrace area lies directly to the west of the downtown area along 9th Street, which has become a symbolic and virtual “divide” between the predominantly black population of West Louisville and the eastern, more affluent predominantly white portions of the city. Built in 1939 as the second low-income residential development in Louisville specifically for African Americans, the aging complex is being replaced with newer housing. Beecher Terrace overlays the remains of more than 380 residences, commercial properties, institutions, and churches of a neighborhood developed in 1860-1870, although evidence of earlier pre-1850 occupations have been found in this early expansion of Louisville to the west. Historic research indicates the area was historically occupied by black and mixed-race working families, as well as German, Irish, and eastern European immigrants. The early neighborhood was found to have been populated by a high frequency of educated African American professionals within the decades immediately following Emancipation.

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A New Occasional Newsletter About Public Archaeology

has just been launched – public archaeology notes.

Notes are a collaborative effort by a consortium of individuals representing a variety of interested groups: the Society for American Archaeology (SAA), the SAA’s Public Education Committee (PEC), the PEC’s Network of State Coordinators, the SAA’s Public Archaeology Interest Group (PAIG), the American Institute of Archaeology (AIA), and others.

Scroll down this first issue, and under spotlight: videos, you’ll see a shout out about Kentucky’s Adena video on the archaeology channel… how about that?

If interested in subscribing click the “Subscribe” button in the upper left corner and follow the instructions.

Making Archaeology Public Project Six states including Kentucky posted

The MAP Project steering committee is delighted to announce that the Making Archaeology Public website has launched, with the first six completed state videos  —  Georgia,  Kentucky, Louisiana, Montana, New Mexico, and Pennsylvania — now available for viewing.  The URL for the site is  http://preservation50.org/mapp/ Please check out the site and enjoy the videos created by your colleagues.  Also be sure to watch the brief introductory video on the website that explains the purpose and philosophy of MAPP.   We are looking forward to adding your videos to the site as soon as possible; we want to maximize visitor traffic by providing new material on a regular basis.

The folks at Preservation 50 will be promoting the site, as will other preservation partners including the ACHP and the major archaeological organizations.  But we hope that you all will help in the promotion effort as well.  We have a great nationwide network right here among the MAPP coordinators!  So please share the information about the MAP Project and the website link through archaeology listserves, avocational society newsletters,  social media such as Facebook, and anything else that occurs to you.  All of the videos on the site can be downloaded and used for any educational, outreach, or other noncommercial purpose.

Kentucky Making Archaeology Public Project Video

Here is the Kentucky video for the Making Archaeology Public Project (MAPP). The project is a cooperative, grassroots effort on the part of professional archaeologists to produce a series of short, engaging videos to showcase for the public some of the fascinating and exciting things that we have learned about life in the past as a result of archaeological work mandated by the National Historic Preservation Act.

33rd Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference Call for Papers and Posters

The 33rd Annual Kentucky Heritage Council Archaeology Conference will be hosted in partnership with the Kentucky Organization of Professional Archaeologists and Kentucky Archaeological Survey at Pine Mountain State Resort Park near Pineville, Kentucky, March 11-13, 2016. In honor of the 50th anniversary of the passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA), much of this year’s conference will be devoted to celebrating the impacts of this significant event in Kentucky Archaeology. For those who wish to present, please complete the 2016 KHC Archaeology Conference_call for presenters form and submit no later than January 31, 2016 via email to Kary Stackelbeck (kary.stackelbeck@ky.gov).